© 2018 by the MacArthur Research Network on Youth and Participatory Politics

Students explore their identities and communities, identify civic issues that matter to them, and consider how they might use digital media for civic participation.

Students work to understand and analyze civic information online, and consider what information they

can trust.

Students navigate diverse perspectives and exchange ideas about civic issues in our inter-connected world .

Students consider how, when and to what end they can create, remix and otherwise re-purpose content that they share with others in online spaces.

Students consider a broad range of tactics and strategies for acting on civic issues. 

VOICE

CONSIDER WHAT, HOW, WHEN, WHY, HOW AND TO WHAT END YOU EXPRESS YOURSELF CIVICALLY ONLINE

closing

reflection

Closing Reflection

(15-20 minutes)

 

Loop back to the broad questions that you and your students explored in this module as a way of reviewing what you covered related to civic voice:

  • Question #1: How do I find my story and express it in ways that are civically meaningful?

  • Question #2: What do I choose to share publicly and what do I keep to myself?

  • Question #3: As I Express Myself, How Will My Message Spread?

  • Question #4: How do I manage the ‘digital afterlife’ of my voice?

 

Ask students to reflect on what they learned by answering the following questions:

CONNECT:

How are the ideas and information presented CONNECTED to what you already knew?

 

EXTEND:

What new ideas did you get that EXTENDED or pushed your thinking in new directions?

 

CHALLENGE:

What is still CHALLENGING or confusing for you to get your mind around? What questions, wonderings or puzzles do you now have?

 

You can then ask students share with a partner. Once they are done, you can ask for a few volunteers to share with the larger group. In particular, you may want to surface what challenges or confusions students still have around these topics.