© 2018 by the MacArthur Research Network on Youth and Participatory Politics

Students explore their identities and communities, identify civic issues that matter to them, and consider how they might use digital media for civic participation.

Students work to understand and analyze civic information online, and consider what information they

can trust.

Students navigate diverse perspectives and exchange ideas about civic issues in our inter-connected world .

Students consider how, when and to what end they can create, remix and otherwise re-purpose content that they share with others in online spaces.

Students consider a broad range of tactics and strategies for acting on civic issues. 

PARTICIPATE

PARTICIPATING IN A CONNECTED WORLD:
EXPLORING CIVIC ISSUES, DISCOVERING CIVIC INTERESTS

QUESTION three:

What civic issue are you curious about that you’d like to understand better and get involved in?

Extension Ideas

 

If you would like to students to explore more civic and political issues you can also reference the following resources below.

  • Watch Stepping Up a short video series produced by KQED featuring four young people working for change in their communities. Your students can also submit their own video, audio or written piece about taking action.

 

  • Watch #Black Twitter After #Ferguson (Brent McDonald & John Woo, The New York Times, 6 min): “On the anniversary of Michael Brown’s death, three prominent activists read their tweets from the past year and reflect on the challenges and legacy of the Black Lives Matter movement.”  

    • After watching, reflect on and reconsider the opportunities and challenges question above in light of the examples and ideas shared in this video.

 

  • Browse the GenForward Project surveys which report information about the civic and political perspectives and behaviors of a racially and ethnically diverse sample of US youth. For example, the July 2016 survey report documents young people’s perspectives on the following topics: the 2016 Campaign, Attitudes toward the Political Parties, Perceptions of Race and the Criminal Justice System, Gun Control, Terrorism, and LGBT Policy Attitudes.

    • Consider how the topics and views covered in the report are similar to and different from what you saw when you looked at the topics and views represented in your online networks.

 

  • Explore letters on Letters to the Next President 2.0. Letters to the Next President 2.0 (L2P 2.0) empowered young people (13-18) to voice their opinions and ideas on the issues that mattered to them in the 2016 election and was built by teachers for teachers and students.

    • After browsing a selection of letters, consider the following questions: What challenges are other youth concerned about? What topics/tags are most popular on the site?

    • Ask students to write their own letters to the president to post on the L2P 2.0 site, share on social media, or just share and discuss with classmates.