DIALOGUE

EXPLORE QUALITIES OF A PRODUCTIVE DIALOGUE ABOUT CIVIC ISSUES - IN PERSON OR ONLINE

TEACHER BACKGROUND

INFORMATION

Online Discussion Platforms and Tools:

 

EdModo

Edublogs

Flipgrid

Google Classroom

Out of Eden Learn’s Dialogue Toolkit

Youth Voices

 

Educating 4 Democracy with videos and resources for Civic Discussion and Deliberation

 

Articles:

Hess, D. & McAvoy, P. (2014).  The Political Classroom. Book and associated resources.

 

Hodgin, E. (2016). Educating Youth for Online Civic and Political Dialogue: A Conceptual Framework for the Digital Age.  Journal of Digital & Media Literacy.

 

James, C. et al. (2016). Getting Into the Fray: Civic Youth, Online Dialogue, and Implications for Digital Literacy Education. Journal of Digital & Media Literacy.

 

James, C. (2014). Disconnected: Youth, New Media, and the Ethics Gap. Cambridge: The MIT Press.

 

Levinson, M., et al. Justice in Schools. A set of resources to support educators as they navigate dilemmas of justice in their schools. Cases studies address discussions of controversial issues including “Politics, partisanship, and pedagogy.” Harvard Graduate School of Education.

 

Middaugh, E. (2016). Blog post. Social media and online communities expose youth to political conversation, but also to incivility and conflict. LSE Parenting for a Digital Future.

 

Schulten, K. (2016). Talking Across Divides: 10 Ways to Encourage Civil Classroom Conversation On Difficult Issues. The New York Times.

 

Sloan, C. Civil DialogueThe Current, Educator Innovator. An excerpt from a Teachers Teaching Teachers episode. Two students from very different backgrounds in a podcast discussion where they disagree and eventually come to an understanding. Listen to how the students learn to listen.

 

Sloan, C. Comment as a Genre. Framing commenting as a genre, a set of principles to guide productive online conversations.


Sloan, C. Fostering Dialogue. The Current, Educator Innovator.