© 2018 by the MacArthur Research Network on Youth and Participatory Politics

Students explore their identities and communities, identify civic issues that matter to them, and consider how they might use digital media for civic participation.

Students work to understand and analyze civic information online, and consider what information they

can trust.

Students navigate diverse perspectives and exchange ideas about civic issues in our inter-connected world .

Students consider how, when and to what end they can create, remix and otherwise re-purpose content that they share with others in online spaces.

Students consider a broad range of tactics and strategies for acting on civic issues. 

DIALOGUE

EXPLORE QUALITIES OF A PRODUCTIVE DIALOGUE ABOUT CIVIC ISSUES - IN PERSON OR ONLINE

QUESTION two:

What do good and not so good online discussions of civic issues look like?

Extension Idea: Looking Closely at Dialogue in Your Networks

(30 minutes)

  • This activity builds on questions from the previous activity, What’s Happening Here? Looking Closely at Online Conversations about Civic Issues. Ask students to find 1-2 comment threads about civic issues they’ve participated in or seen on their go-to social media site. If students do not use social media, ask them to choose a comment thread on an article on a news site such as CNN.com, washingtonpost.com, or USAToday.com.

  • Working on their own, ask students to notice the specific commenting moves being used in the exchanges and interpret the possible intentions behind and impacts of the comments.

  • Further questions to consider:

    • What’s the overall tone of each exchange? What makes you say that?

    • What are the most common ‘moves’ people use to discuss civic issues?  

    • What kinds of commenting moves are seen less often or are missing?  

    • What would you like to see more of and less of when people talk about civic issues in your networks?