© 2018 by the MacArthur Research Network on Youth and Participatory Politics

Students explore their identities and communities, identify civic issues that matter to them, and consider how they might use digital media for civic participation.

Students work to understand and analyze civic information online, and consider what information they

can trust.

Students navigate diverse perspectives and exchange ideas about civic issues in our inter-connected world .

Students consider how, when and to what end they can create, remix and otherwise re-purpose content that they share with others in online spaces.

Students consider a broad range of tactics and strategies for acting on civic issues. 

DIALOGUE

EXPLORE QUALITIES OF A PRODUCTIVE DIALOGUE ABOUT CIVIC ISSUES - IN PERSON OR ONLINE

closing

reflection

Closing Reflection

(15-20 minutes)

 

Loop back at the broad questions that your students explored in this module. Ask students to reflect on their own and then with a partner about any shifts in their thinking about civic dialogue.

 

  • Question #1: What are the opportunities and challenges of in-person vs. online dialogue about civic issues?    

    • How have your understandings of the upsides and downsides of online dialogue shifted?  (“I used to think…”, “Now, I think….)

 

  • Question #2: What do good and not so good online discussions of civic issues look like?  

    • How has your thinking about good or not-so-good online discussion changed?   (“I used to think…”, “Now, I think….)

 

  • Question #3: How can we make good online dialogue about civic issues happen?

    • Has the dialogue toolkit given you new strategies for approaching online discussions? Why/why not? If so, identify at least 3 dialogue tools you use or could use to navigate a disagreement on social media.

    • Based on your discussion about norms, do you have any new ideas about ways to make online discussions more productive?