© 2018 by the MacArthur Research Network on Youth and Participatory Politics

Students explore their identities and communities, identify civic issues that matter to them, and consider how they might use digital media for civic participation.

Students work to understand and analyze civic information online, and consider what information they

can trust.

Students navigate diverse perspectives and exchange ideas about civic issues in our inter-connected world .

Students consider how, when and to what end they can create, remix and otherwise re-purpose content that they share with others in online spaces.

Students consider a broad range of tactics and strategies for acting on civic issues. 

ACTION

RESPOND TO ISSUES YOU CARE ABOUT,
EXTEND YOUR DEFINITION OF CIVIC ACTION
IN THE DIGITAL AGE

conversation starter:

how has the internet changed the conversation?

This conversation starter invites students to respond to a meme depicting 'slacktivism'  >

Conversation Starter

(15-30 minutes)

Memes like this one suggest that the advent of the Internet ushered in the age of ‘slacktivism’ or ‘clicktivism’, defined as a low-commitment mode of engagement. While such critiques bring up some useful points, they largely overlook the ways that digital and social media expand (rather than divert) the spectrum of possibilities when it comes to taking civic action.

 

To kick-start a conversation with your students about what has changed in the digital age, reflect on the above meme by asking:

‚Äč

  • What does this meme suggest about how the Internet has changed social and civic action?

  • How are things different today compared to social movements from the past (before the digital age)? Can you think of examples that would demonstrate what has changed?

  • What has stayed the same? Can you think of examples that demonstrate what has stayed the same?