© 2018 by the MacArthur Research Network on Youth and Participatory Politics

Students explore their identities and communities, identify civic issues that matter to them, and consider how they might use digital media for civic participation.

Students work to understand and analyze civic information online, and consider what information they

can trust.

Students navigate diverse perspectives and exchange ideas about civic issues in our inter-connected world .

Students consider how, when and to what end they can create, remix and otherwise re-purpose content that they share with others in online spaces.

Students consider a broad range of tactics and strategies for acting on civic issues. 

ACTION

RESPOND TO ISSUES YOU CARE ABOUT,
EXTEND YOUR DEFINITION OF CIVIC ACTION
IN THE DIGITAL AGE

closing

reflection

Closing Reflection

(15-20 minutes)

 

Loop back to the broad questions that you and your students explored in this module as a way of reviewing what you covered related to taking action:

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  • Question #1: What can we learn from social change efforts from the past?

  • Question #2: What does it mean to take action around social issues in the digital age?

  • Question #3: Is online activism “slacktivism” or just another way to take action? What are the risks?

  • Question #4: How do we determine a course of action using social media?

 

Ask students to reflect on what they learned by creating a news headline that summarizes the key ideas in a brief compelling statement. You can ask students to work on their own or in pairs or small groups. Share the following prompt with students:

 

If you were to write a headline for this topic right now that captured the most important aspect that should be remembered, what would that headline be?

 

If you’d like to add a visual element, you can also ask students to draw an image that would go alongside of the headline. Encourage students to be creative.

 

Once they are done, you can ask students to share with a larger group or with the whole class.